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New Providence landfill to be ready and operational on March 1 | 07 February 2015

The new landfill at Providence will be ready and operational on March 1 this year.

This came to light yesterday following a visit to the site by the new Minister for Environment, Energy and Climate Change, Didier Dogley.

He was accompanied by his principal secretary for environment Alain Decomarmond and the chief executive of the Land Waste Management Agency, Lena Desaubin.

Noting that this was his first visit since taking up his new ministerial post, Mr Dogley said he wanted to assess the area and see what needs to be done before the opening of the landfill.

The new landfill covers an area of 33,000 square metres and 400 tonnes of sand fill will be needed per month to cover the garbage.

This new sanitary landfill will replace the current one which has already reached its limit. However the latter will still be used for bulky waste such as large appliances.
“We are happy that Seychelles is now using the same standard as the US and Europe for containing waste. It has four pumps connected to it. This shift will allow the first landfill to settle down and allow plants to grow naturally on it,” explained the minister.

The minister said it is unfortunate that we are not producing compost.

“50% of our waste can be reused. Already we are happy to see some people doing business with our waste. Now scrap metal, pet bottles, cans and batteries are being exported. Those with economic value will be exported. It is also unfortunate that we are buying cheap appliances that are contributing more waste to our environment. We will be working with various consumer groups to try and educate our population on this matter,” Minister Dogley said.

The minister also talked about the responsibility of each one of us concerning waste management. “Waste management is about proper collection and reduction of waste; enforcement of laws and education. We will work with the different private companies, the press and other organisations to keep educating our people on the type of products we are buying. We recognise there is quite a bit of work to do but we all have this responsibility to keep our Seychelles clean,” he said.

The minister remarked that “a lot of efforts has been put in the biodiversity and our challenge remains now how to turn waste into a resource. The government is also working in setting up a tribunal by the end of this year to deal mainly with offences/crimes against the environment and also to deal with transport issues”.

Ms Desaubin added that everyday there are inspectors going around the islands to make sure that garbage are being collected.

“We always have some people who go against the law and keep dumping their waste illegally. We are requesting everyone to please respect the laws regarding the dumping of waste and get help from our agency,” she implored.

Lemmy Payet, consultant for the Land Waste Management Agency, gave details about the new landfill and explained how it will function.


The new landfill at Providence will be ready and operational on March 1 this year.

This came to light yesterday following a visit to the site by the new Minister for Environment, Energy and Climate Change, Didier Dogley.

He was accompanied by his principal secretary for environment Alain Decomarmond and the chief executive of the Land Waste Management Agency, Lena Desaubin.

Noting that this was his first visit since taking up his new ministerial post, Mr Dogley said he wanted to assess the area and see what needs to be done before the opening of the landfill.

The new landfill covers an area of 33,000 square metres and 400 tonnes of sand fill will be needed per month to cover the garbage.

This new sanitary landfill will replace the current one which has already reached its limit. However the latter will still be used for bulky waste such as large appliances.
“We are happy that Seychelles is now using the same standard as the US and Europe for containing waste. It has four pumps connected to it. This shift will allow the first landfill to settle down and allow plants to grow naturally on it,” explained the minister.

The minister said it is unfortunate that we are not producing compost.

“50% of our waste can be reused. Already we are happy to see some people doing business with our waste. Now scrap metal, pet bottles, cans and batteries are being exported. Those with economic value will be exported. It is also unfortunate that we are buying cheap appliances that are contributing more waste to our environment. We will be working with various consumer groups to try and educate our population on this matter,” Minister Dogley said.

The minister also talked about the responsibility of each one of us concerning waste management. “Waste management is about proper collection and reduction of waste; enforcement of laws and education. We will work with the different private companies, the press and other organisations to keep educating our people on the type of products we are buying. We recognise there is quite a bit of work to do but we all have this responsibility to keep our Seychelles clean,” he said.

The minister remarked that “a lot of efforts has been put in the biodiversity and our challenge remains now how to turn waste into a resource. The government is also working in setting up a tribunal by the end of this year to deal mainly with offences/crimes against the environment and also to deal with transport issues”.

Ms Desaubin added that everyday there are inspectors going around the islands to make sure that garbage are being collected.

“We always have some people who go against the law and keep dumping their waste illegally. We are requesting everyone to please respect the laws regarding the dumping of waste and get help from our agency,” she implored.

Lemmy Payet, consultant for the Land Waste Management Agency, gave details about the new landfill and explained how it will function.

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