New gospel programme ‘highlights importance of worship on the day of the Lord’


07-July-2012

A church group recording a programme


Among the viewers is the head of the Catholic Church Bishop Denis Wiehe who is also a member of the Seychelles Inter-Faith Committee (Sifco).

“It is a very good initiative and I rejoice because it highlights the importance of worship on the day of the Lord -- Sunday),” said Bishop Wiehe.

The programme, entitled Senm Laglwar which started early last month, was initiated by SBC TV and it aims to touch people’s lives and bring them a sense of spiritual purpose through gospel music at a time when there is a national call for moral renaissance in our society.

“Music unites people and gospel music is very popular especially among the young people from different religious denominations and it is a good way to convey messages fast,” the chief executive of SBC, Antoine Onezime, said.

Mr Onezime said Senm Laglwar aims to tap into the growing popularity of gospel music to create in the audience a sense spiritual belonging, spontaneity, joy, and meaningful worship, on the day reserved for God.

“It aims to emphasise the importance of spirituality, morality and living values which are very important for healthy nation-building and national development,” he said.

He added that the programme is not a platform for preaching or advancing the different interpretations of the Bible but rather it offers the possibility for worship through reflection, short prayers and messages from ordained priests or pastors.

He said the groups are free to come up with their own themes.
Bishop Wiehe believes it is a great opportunity “for different groups from different denominations and religions to come forward  to help us praise God and pray to Him”.

As the Catholic Church representative on the Sifco, Bishop Wiehe noted that the aim of meeting and being open to other religious groups is first of all a sign of respect for each person and the fundamental right of each one to follow his/her conscience and choice of faith/religion.
“By respecting others I do not stop believing in my own religion and it does not stop me from affirming my faith and proclaiming it before others,” said Bishop Wiehe.

Mr Onezime said the programme is open to the entire Christian community adding that church as well as school or workplace choirs are all welcome to take part.

Since the programme started early June, Mr Onezime said viewers have been able to appreciate a large selection of gospel songs and music from various church groups among them the Seventh Day Adventist, Anglican, Catholic, Redeemed Christian Church of God, among others.

He noted that various other groups have already been to the studio to record their programmes.
Mr Onezime expressed satisfaction at the level of interest shown and said he hopes more groups will continue to come forward to keep to momentum of the programme.

M-A.L.

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