Beach nourishment pilot project underway at North East Point


05-March-2013

Work underway to fill up the stretch of beach at North East Point

The project, which started last week, had up to yesterday morning saw some 923 tons of sand already filled in the 360-metre stretch of beach just opposite the Kreolfleurage Parfums.
The pilot project falls under Seychelles’ cooperation with the Japanese government and it is being funded by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (Jica).

It is part of a programme on coastal erosion and flooding which has been underway for the past couple of years and the North East Point beach nourishment project is the first of its kind to be undertaken here.

Once completed it is expected to remedy coastal erosion caused by waves and heavy storms around this stretch of road.
Yesterday morning the director general for climate affairs, adaptation and information Alain De Commarmond together with the Jica team leader Dr Hashimoto and project consultant Lemmy Payet visited the site to take stock of the work underway.

Local contractor Benoiton Construction is carrying out the project.

“Storm surges, extreme high tides have been a big problem around this area, eroding away and damaging the road and posing a constant threat to both traffic and pedestrians, but this project is hopefully expected to create a better and wider shoreline and give the road a better gradient. Eventually this is expected to reduce the effects of adverse weather by dissipating the energy surge generated,” Mr De Commarmond explained.

(L to r) Mr De Commarmond, Mr Payet and Dr Hashimoto at the site to take stock of ongoing work

He said if all goes well the project is expected to be completed in six to seven weeks’ time and its effectiveness is expected to be put to the test when there is a new storm surge and extreme high tide. 

But Mr De Commarmond said the Ministry of Environment and Energy is confident the project will be a success as a lot of background work has been carried out before it really kicked off. 
The project, which is used in various parts of the world, is costing over half a million rupees.

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